Monday, March 14, 2011

Balrog: Part 4

Primed. I'm considering painting the flames using the technique I've never tried before. This worries me a little bit, but nothing ventured, nothing gained.

Monday, March 7, 2011

Balrog: Part 3

Did some gap filling this past weekend. Next step is to do some filing to make sure I haven't missed anything, then I can move on to priming.

Wednesday, March 2, 2011


Here's a bunch of Easterlings I finished painting over the weekend--well, it would have been, but my daughter saw me taking the picture and insisted one of her toys get in the frame...

Here we go... I batch painted most of them, which is why they all got done roughly at the same time. I'm heartened by getting so many done, it makes my mountain of miniatures left to paint slightly smaller.

Saturday, February 26, 2011

Balrog: Part 2

Finished the assembly of the miniatures themselves, next step is to fill in all the joins with green stuff. Did some looking for a base to mount them on, and wasn't all that happy with what was available. I'll be looking for something more suitable at the hobby store later this week if I can make it down there.

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Armor Styles

Games Workshop's Empire and Bretonnian ranges each have a distinct style to them, influenced by different periods in history.  The Bretonnian range is influenced mainly by European armor from the period of the Crusades through the Hundred Years War.
Grail Knight (Image copyright Games Workshop)

For example, the helmets tend to be primarily Great Helms for knights, and lots of mail.
Bretonnian Lord (Image copyright Games Workshop)

Peasants, for their part, would usually wear a mail coif, chapel-de-fer, or cervelliere.  (although admittedly peasant equipment didn't change all that much with time)
Bretonnian Men-at-Arms (Image copyright Games Workshop)

The Empire, on the other hand, has a distinct Renaissance style to it.  This guy, for example has a cuirass with tassets and a sallet, but other than that, does not wear much leg or arm armor.
Empire Captain (Image copyright Games Workshop)

The Empire Greatsword is the same way--sallet helm, breastplate with tassets, but that's it. 
Empire Greatsword (Image copyright Games Workshop)

By the the time of the Renaissance, guns were having a larger role on the battlefield.  Full-plate armor still existed and would continue to do so for a while, of course, but less often would you see the fully armored man-at-arms in battle.

Both of these styles are just fine...what irks me is that both styles bracket the time period that I think has the coolest armor.  Personally, I think that the time of the Wars of the Roses had some of the coolest looking armor in history.  In this conflict, which spanned from 1455 to 1485, the "Transitional Period" of armor development (that is, from mail to plate) was essentially complete.  Full plate armor had come into its own by this point.

Michael and Alan Perry, whose day jobs are with GW, also have their own independent miniatures company.  They've done some excellent miniatures from the period of the Wars of the Roses. 
(Image copyright Perry Miniatures)

(Image copyright Perry Miniatures)

Now this armor is pretty awesome looking, if you ask me.  Too bad GW doesn't have any (or many) miniatures that look like these guys.  Seeing as the Perry Brothers also do GW minis, I imagine that the miniatures that they make on their own would fit well alongside GW's Warhammer minis.  (although not perfectly, of course).  I'm really tempted to pick up some of them.

Adventures In Miniature Gaming did a review of a box of plastics done by the Perrys that's worth checking out as well.

Monday, February 14, 2011

Balrog: Part 1

I received my first miniatures commission recently. Well, sort of. It's more a favor for a friend, who promised to do it for another friend, but doesn't have the time (she has a good excuse--she's leaving for the Peace Corps soon). Lest you think I'm doing this solely out of the kindness of my heart, since my friend will be out of country for a few years, she kindly sent me all of her paints, plus some stray miniatures that she's had in storage.

Anyway, I recently received the Balrog in the mail. I'll be doing some progress posts on it as the work comes along.

Laying everything out, it looks like all the pieces are present.

Evening 1 consisted of primarily cleaning all the pieces, and doing some basic assembly.
Before I go too much further, I'll need to start working on the display base so I can get the layout right.